Book Group

We at St. Andrew’s strive to achieve the ideal of equal justice and equal opportunities for people of color and the oppressed.
 
We are committed to responsibly embracing the social, spiritual and intellectual challenges of the world. Today’s challenges are complex. The recent tragic incidents of deadly violence in our country remind us that we still have much work to do to create an inclusive community and address the challenge of undoing the structural and sustained racism that exists today.

Our Book Group aims to create opportunities for awareness of the multiple dimensions of racism, social power, and faith as a factor for reconciliation and redemption in social relationships.

In addition, St. Andrew’s cares deeply about the safety and emotional well-being of all; we support the establishment of policies and laws that protect gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, questioning and gender non-conforming youth and students. 

 
 
Book Group:
 
Our book group meets every two weeks to discuss books that discuss race, implicit bias, intersectionality, gender, and how we can work to combat institutionalized racism in our communities and our country. 

Our current book is Love is the Way, Holding on to Hope in Troubling Times by Bishop Michael Curry.
 Books we have read so far:

  • So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo
  • How to be an Anti-Racist by Ibram X. Kendi
  • Be the Bridge: Pursuing God's Heart for Racial Reconciliation by Latasha Morrison


Email any questions to Sarah Raynold, sarahraynold@gmail.com

Book group Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84727976186

Resources

The Episcopal Church in Connecticut:


Video: First recorded use of slaves in Madison
As part of St. Andrew's series on Racial Healing, Justice, and Reconciliation, Terry Roberts, President of the Deacon John Graves Foundation, shared his research about the first recorded use of slaves in Madison, CT, as taken from the journals recorded by generations of the Deacon John Graves family, starting in 1685.